That which doesn’t kill you…

I had to stand and pace, even though my headphones had me tethered to my laptop.

For some reason, I can’t seem to have a decent conversation with an entrepreneur while sitting down. Fortunately, I get to chat with quite a few entrepreneurs. Unfortunately, I haven’t gotten around to investing in a decent pair of wireless headphones.


Today, I was having a discovery call with an entrepreneur, tethered and pacing. And he asked a horribly wonderfully horrible perfect question, “What do you think about my idea?”

Obviously, I had to tell the truth:

“I really couldn’t care less about your idea. I just care whether you are going to put in the reps. And get up the next day, and put in the reps. And when someone tells you your idea is stupid, you get up and put in the reps. And when the market shifts, you adjust and put in the reps. And when you have an amazingly successful week, you still get up the next day and put in the reps… Oh, and by the way, I happen to love the space you’re working in, so please don’t quit your idea.”

Later in the afternoon, during my 1:1 with the CEO at Revelry, we were talking about goals for 2017. He was telling me about how he is defining a new set of habits above and beyond just listing off some big targets down the road. Which sent me searching for a James Clear article about Warren Buffet’s “2 List” strategy.

Buried at the bottom was this gem I think I missed before:


“The most dangerous distractions are the ones you love, but that don’t love you back.”

/via James Clear


It is easy to “hustle” or “grind.”

It is much more difficult to put in the reps on the very specific things you need to strengthen.

It is easy to make a list of goals.

It is much more difficult to build new habits.

For myself, and for our clients, I always want to push us harder and harder to focus on doing the right things for the right reasons. And to build habits around the activities that will help our businesses grow.

Let’s Meet @ Collision in NOLA

I’ll keep this short and sweet: I want to meet up with you at Collision this week.

Here are the two best ways I know how to make this happen:

My company, Revelry Labs, is one of the sponsoring partners, and we’re hosting a party for the open source community on Wednesday night at 7:15. Kegs, crawfish, a legit second line, and a mardi gras float. Register with your Collision Badge to come gitchasome.

Or, lets meet up 1:1. Grab whatever time works best for you. Details for coordinating the exact location will be in the calendar invite you will automatically receive. (Direct link in case embed is weird on mobiles.)


Yet another small percentage of your life will be used up.


“Every time you say yes to something you don’t want to do, this will happen: you will resent people, you will do a bad job, you will have less energy for the things you were doing a good job on, you will make less money, and yet another small percentage of your life will be used up, burned up, a smoke signal to the future saying, ‘I did it again.’”

– James Altucher, Choose Yourself

Convert Ideas to Actions

Every competitive sports team does this thing called, “practicing.”

Instead of just playing a lot of games, they actually get together outside of their games to practice things. And, they don’t just just their practice times to play more games. Instead, they break down the fundamentals of the game, create drills to improve those core sills, and practice them. Over and over and over.

This is the thing I can’t get out of my head right now: break down ideas into drills. I don’t want to teach people ideas. I want to coach people through drills.

AKA – Why I would rather invest in #MNTech

There are some great things about the bay area. But most of those great things can be experienced or gained simply by flying in and flying back out. I would much rather invest my time and energy into growing the startup community in the TwinCities than deal with things like above.

todo: Update LinkedIn Profile

Even though I recently complained about LinkedIn breaking some of their core functionality, I still believe LinkedIn is a valuable platform.

Now that I’ve sold my most recent company, it is time to update my profile to focus on The Next Thing.

My buddy Chris Brogan has recently shared some good tips on creating the best profile, so I’ll be digging through these for some advice:

In the comments, Jeffrey pointed me to some other good resources:

Do you have any secret tips, or other resources you like?